Events

Events are hosted monthly with every second month being a topic focused round-table discussion and alternate months being an informal discussion format.

NEXT MEETING

Workshop: Elixir

Date: Thursday June 09th, 2016
Time:6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location:Center for Open Science

210 Ridge McIntire Road
Suite 500
Charlottesville, VA

We'd like to steal an idea from DevOpsCV and devote June's meeting to a workshop on the Elixir language. We'll be going through the tutorial found at https://howistart.org/posts/elixir/1. Attendees will each work through the tutorial while one of us leads the process and facilitates. 

Past Meetings

DevOpsCV Incubator: What is DevOps and what does it look like in practice?

Date: Wednesday October 08th, 2014
Time:6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location:Center for Open Science

210 Ridge McIntire Road
Suite 500
Charlottesville, VA

This month beCraft will be acting as an incubator for the new DevOpsCV meetup. The beCraft/DevOpsCV meeting will be at the Center for Open Science on 10/8 from 6-8 PM. Vince Rivellino will be discussing what DevOps looks like in practice at RoomKey. Room Key is an experience-tailored hotel search engine created by six of the world's leading hotel companies. Its engineering group is based right here in Charlottesville. Vince has played a key role in establishing an awesome DevOps Culture at Room Key. In his talk he will offer his opinions on what DevOps really is and discuss Room Key's DevOps culture, including how they wrangle AWS using CloudFormation and CloudWatch, their deployment methodologies, and how developers fit into operations.

Lightning Talks and Open Format Discussion

Date: Wednesday September 10th, 2014
Time:6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location:OpenSource Connections
110 Goodman St
Suite A3
Charlottesville, VA 22902
 
OSC is the big yellow door in the middle.
 

This month's meeting will be a mixed format. We'll start with 5 minute lightning talks and then move into an open format discussion. The lightning talks are a perfect place to try out topics you'd like to propose at beCamp.

A Survey of Statistical Anomaly Detection Methods

Date: Wednesday August 13th, 2014
Time:6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location:VividCortex

250 West Main St
Suite 201
Charlottesville, VA

Many data scientists working with machine data are looking to anomaly detection as a means to discover interesting needles in the haystack. Although more sophisticated and robust methods exist, statistical methods are often a good simple approximation to the truth, and can be made very efficient.
 
This talk will cover the following:
 
  • What is anomaly detection?
  • Why are people expressing interest in anomaly detection?
  • What statistical techniques are often used?
  • What should we learn from disciplines such as finance?
  • How well do statistical techniques work on machine data?
  • What online/realtime methods can be applied for high throughput and efficiency?
  • What options, besides statistical techniques, are worth considering?
 
Although this presentation will include some math, it will all be explained in intuitive terms, so no mathematical background is needed to understand the concepts presented. Sample data and a spreadsheet will be provided so you can repeat the examples.
 

Topic: Database History from Codd to Brewer and Beyond

Date: Wednesday May 14th, 2014
Time:6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location:OpenSource Connections

110 Goodman St
Suite A3
Charlottesville, VA 22902

OSC is the big yellow door in the middle.

There are innumerable technical lessons to learn from database history.
Its easy to go with what's new and trendy. Its harder to appreciate
technical reasons why one approach suddenly became more favored than
another. History highlights the limitations and power behind database
solutions. If we don't learn from history we are doomed to repeat it: -
What were the first databases like (Codasyl, etc)? Why did they start
out this way? - Why was RDMS the right technical response to the non
RDMS databases back in the day? - Why was the move away from RDMS to
NoSQL the right technical solution for many problems today? A great
introductory to the basic technical scaffolding and historic context for
NoSQL, from this talk, you'll have a deeper appreciation of the
transition from vertically scaling Big Metal to horizontally scaling Big
Data.

Topic: Stream Architectures for Real-time Data Analysis

Date: Wednesday March 12th, 2014
Time:6:00pm to 8:00pm
Location:Center for Open Science

210 Ridge McIntire Road
Suite 500
Charlottesville, VA

 The Center for Open Science is located in the Downtown Business Center (DBC) of the Omni Hotel. The DBC faces Ridge/McIntire Rd. opposite Staples/McDonalds. You can park in the Omni parking garage – it's free, just bring your ticket inside for validation. You can enter through the glass doors in the front. Or, walk through the lobby of the Omni Hotel past the concierge desk, ballrooms, and through a set of double doors.

Some of the biggest issues at the center of analyzing large amounts of data are query flexibility, latency, and fault tolerance. Modern technologies that build upon the success of “big data” platforms, such as Apache Hadoop, have made it possible to spread the load of data analysis to commodity machines, but these analyses can still take hours to run and do not respond well to rapidly-changing data sets.

A new generation of data processing platforms -- which Parse.ly internally calls “stream architectures” -- have converted data sources into streams of data that can be processed and analyzed in real-time. This has led to the development of various distributed real-time computation frameworks (e.g. Apache Storm) and high-performance data integration technologies (e.g. Apache Kafka). Andrew Montalenti (Parse.ly's co-founder & CTO) will give an overview from what he has seen in the field, and how his team applied this knowledge to a backend re-implementation at Parse.ly.

Relevant links: Parse.ly - his company (http://parse.ly); Pixel Monkey - his blog (http://pixelmonkey.org); @amontalenti - his twitter handle (http://twitter.com/amontalenti).

Some background links:
Andrew's post about that LinkedIn post: The Log: a building block for large-scale data systems
Big Data by Nathan Marz describing a similar architecture: MEAP and Free 1st Chapter (PDF)

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